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English sentences with genome in context,

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You seem to be implying that this female of the species is working diligently to practice "opening" herself to the male of the species without making it too obvious, so as not to arouse the suspicions of the other other competing females of this species, as a means of replicating her genome, at the expense of her competitors (known as "bitches").
source: Redditshow contexthide context

Genome sequencing can be a huge pain.
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Dictionary
genome (noun)

  •   The complete genetic information (either DNA or, in some viruses, RNA) of an organism.
source: Wiktionary

Just finished sequencing two genomes for bacteria at ~1.9 million bases.
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I can't even fathom a genome at 2 billion bps full of repeats.
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The blockchain already has more bits than the human genome.
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We can sequence genomes reasonably easily now, but working out the meaning of those sequences is like a three-year-old trying to read Shakespeare.
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Whole genome sequencing makes me happy.
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Not one single gene in the human genome distinguishes all members from one so-called race from another so-called race.
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At one point, scientists speculated that there could be ~100,000 genes in the human genome.
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The genome project and continued investigation has seen that number drop to an estimated 15k-25k.
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Genome abilities are transferred to the whole party, even if only person learns them, e.g.
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From then on, the rest of the party can use it if they select 'Genome Abilities.'
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Unless you know how to sequence you genome and interpret that, I think your just gonna have to wait, man.
source: Reddit

(an offshoot of bioinformatics which combines genome and phenotype data to shorten the number of generations needed to breed a specific trait into a crop or other organism)
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the perpetual political ideology of Genome Soldiers ?
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Sonic The Hedgehog isn't only the name of Sega's speedy character, but also a gene on chromosome 7 of the human genome.
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The genome must've been pretty big.
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The active genome sequences were surprisingly the complement of a modern human’s genome.
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With years of research, the human genome was finally understood.
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Ending a 1-2 year ordeal, the entire human body forms a primordial soup of organic matter and over time begins a complex reassembly, strictly following the ‘other’ part of the genome.
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So they came up with their own project: The human genome project.
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We know the genome and it fell flat on it's promises, that got downgraded more and more until we were left with some minor improvements on knowledge and capabilities we already had.
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As our species evolves (an ongoing process), every new child is the human genome taking a new stab at building a better brain more suited for thriving in it's environment.
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If copy errors/mutations occur approximately 60-160 times, then at least 85% of those copy errors/mutations are occurring in significant parts of the genome.
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Bad mutations are very common, and their effects are much worse than what good mutations help (this is intuitive given that the majority of the genome serves a purpose – 85% or more being functional/purposeful information).
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It's important because when we sequenced the human genome and found that we had less genes than a wheat plant many scientists were confounded.
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The complexity of the human genome continues to bewilder researchers.
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Unless we can develop nanotech robots that use a personalized "known good" genome to parse and fix errors or kill fusion positive cells, there will never be one cure for cancer.
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This is because even a small change would completely alter an organisms entire genome, and would almost certainly make it non-viable.
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I'll be running World Community Grid (Uncovering Genome Mysteries and Let's outsmart Ebola together), SETI@Home, and WUProp.
source: Reddit

I did my PhD working on personalized cancer genome sequencing too .
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The Human Genome Project.
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It's like killing Lord Genome, just to give way to an even greater threat.
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Of course the effectiveness of medical treatment can depend on our genome, but that does not mean there are multiple human races.
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Studying to work in future research sequencing genomes of newly discovered viruses to learn their origins and weaknesses
source: Reddit

Lord genome tanked a big bang for a couple of seconds does Satsuki has such a feat?
source: Reddit

Rebuilding genomes seems to be more likely, working backwards from modern avians.
source: Reddit

Well, it's easy I'd say to draw a line between "repairing anomalies in the genome" and "enhancing said genome".
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We know what a "well formed human genome" looks like.
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I will teach you the Evolution of the human genome with the largest amount of scientific proof that has ever been seen; mark my words.
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We don't know what may have changed in this fish over the millennia, but I'm willing to bet most of its genomes are slightly different from the ancestral fossil's.
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Yep there is a really great TEDmed talk with him and Sharon, after they sequenced his genome
source: Reddit

Well to be fair, not many people have had their genome mapped out so their are also probably other mutations people have that we've yet to discover and Ozzy's mutation was probably the RESULT of doing so much drugs and alcohol.
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But since those post-transcriptional processes occur in cells designed in the first place by that DNA strand, those processes are still resting on a genome that produces surviving offspring.
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Building a genome from scratch, with modules and scripts and whatever else is needed, and then hitting "make new friend!
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So last month, for any of you who missed it (which I'm sure is no one) there was some sort of technological breakthrough with the human genome or something.
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A lot depends on their genome, and of course their environment...available resources, dangers...etc.
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If a 'word' in our genome isn't the perfect version and kills us after 150 or 200 years of living, that isn't going to be a problem in today's society.
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We also invented the steam engine, the first vaccine, the telephone, the first gasoline internal combustion engine, the computer, mapped the human genome, British inventors were pioneers when it came to the internet, etc etc etc etc.
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